Training Google Mail (or Gmail) for Spam Filtering

Email spam

Have you ever had the experience of someone insisting that they sent you an email, but you can’t find it, only to look later in your Spam or Junk folder and find it hiding there? Now why would your mail app decide one thing is spam and another is not?

Email providers like Google, Yahoo, and Hotmail invest a lot of resources into making their spam filters do a good job of accurately identifying what is valid email and what is not. Sometimes they do a good job of that, and sometime they get a little over-zealous. This can result in what is called a “false positive.” That’s where an email may contain one or more traits that make it look like spam. This can be as simple as the email containing the word “spam” in the title or in the body.

All email providers use a varied list of criteria to give each incoming email a score. If the score of the combined factors goes over a certain threshold, then BAM – it goes into the spam folder. The Verge has an article about how Google now uses Artificial Intelligence to block spam.

How come I don’t see the spam?

Your email client (such as Apple’s included Apple Mail) does have its own junk filter. But that only comes into play once you check your mail from your provider’s servers. And that is long after their servers have already filtered out spam. That is why you may not see messages flagged as spam unless you log in to your account via a web browser at www.gmail.com.

If you use Gmail or Google mail (many non-profit and .org’s do) you can train it to remove false-positives. That way, email that you know is valid will no longer be filtered out as spam. The video below shows you how.

If you would like some help with this and any other aspects of keeping your email healthy and happy, contact us and we will be glad to take care of you!

Update your software now

You secure your valuables – your wallets, keys, and homes. You know that, if left unsecured, they can easily be a target for criminals. So it makes sense to think the same way about the information stored on all your electronic devices.

Computers, tablets, phones and other personal devices hold your emails and your financial and tax documents (with your Social Security numbers). Criminals who get access to this valuable information can commit identity theft, put harmful software on your devices, or both.

What’s one easy way to help protect all of this sensitive information? Update your software regularly, and as soon as possible when a newer version comes out. What’s an even easier way? Set the updates to happen automatically. Don’t ignore reminders to update. Criminals look to exploit vulnerabilities before the software companies can fix it. Delaying gives hackers time to access your information – even when a patch is out there to lock them out.

So what software should you be updating?

  1. Security software. Whether you use antivirus or firewall programs that were pre-installed on your device or that you bought on your own, make sure they’re up to date.
  2. Operating system software. Your operating system could be Windows, Apple OS, etc. If you’re not sure how to update your operating system, go to the website of your device manufacturer for help.
  3. Internet browsers and apps. Both are access points for criminals to enter your devices, so it’s important to keep them secure. 

For browsers, the Safari and Google Chrome browsers update themselves. For Firefox, go to the Firefox menu and choose “About Firefox” which will open a window and offer to download the latest update (if pending).

For iPhones and iPads, go to Settings:General:Software Update and turn on Automatic Updates.

For MacOS, we recommend going to System Preferences:Software Update and clicking on the Advanced… button (you will need to enter your Admin password) and setting your preferences this way, so that only the most major updates won’t be automatically applied for you:

Looking for more tips on how to stay safe online? Check out FTC.gov/OnGuardOnline.

It’s all too much!

What’s that you say? You’d rather just have a Macintosh consultant based in Denver just do it for you and be done with it? Absolutely! Contact us and we will get it done for you!

How to Encrypt your Mac’s Hard Drive

You may have heard of the words “FileVault” and “encryption” relating to your Mac’s hard drive, and you may be wondering if you should use this higher level of security and if it is easy to implement. The answer to all of this is “yes”. Even though you’ve already protected your Mac with a login password, encryption takes your safety and security to a whole new level.

How does Encryption work?

Encryption is industrial-level protection for your drive, such that probably no one, short of the NSA, would be able to retrieve your data should your device be lost or stolen. Apple has really improved their full-disk encryption in the last years (known as FileVault) so that it is easy to set up, and using it is basically transparent to the user.

About the only difference a user will notice is that upon boot-up, you will be asked for your login password right away, as that is required to unencrypt the entire drive.

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then choose Security & Privacy.
  2. Click the FileVault tab.
  3. Then click the padlock in the lower left corner, and enter an administrator name and password.
  4. Click the “Turn On FileVault” button.
osx-security-privacy-filevault

If other users have accounts on your Mac, you might see a message that each user must type in their password before they will be able to unlock the disk. For each user, click the Enable User button and enter the user’s password. OS X automatically enables any user accounts that you add after turning on FileVault.

osx-security-privacy-filevault-users-sheet

Choose how you want to be able to unlock your disk and reset your password, in case you ever forget your password:

  • If you’re using OS X 10.9 or newer, you can choose to store a FileVault recovery key with Apple by providing the questions and answers to three security questions. Choose answers that you’re sure to remember.
  • If you’re using OS X 10.10 or later, you can choose to use your iCloud account to unlock your disk and reset your password (I recommend this choice).
  • If you don’t want to use iCloud FileVault recovery, you can create a local recovery key. Keep the letters and numbers of the key somewhere safe—other than on your encrypted startup disk.
osx-elcapitan-security-privacy-filevault-recovery-key-sheet

IMPORTANT: If you lose or forget both your OS X account password and your FileVault recovery key, you won’t be able to log in to your Mac or access the data on your startup disk.

When FileVault setup is complete, your Mac restarts and asks you to log in with your account password. Your password unlocks your disk and allows your Mac to finish starting up. FileVault requires that you log in every time your Mac starts up, and no account is permitted to log in automatically.

osx-mac-login-screen

After your Mac starts up, encryption of your startup disk occurs in the background as you use your Mac. This takes time, and it happens only while your Mac is awake and plugged in to AC power. You can check progress in the FileVault section of Security & Privacy preferences. Any new files that you create are automatically encrypted as they’re saved to your startup disk

Encrypting Your Backup Drive

In addition to encrypting your hard drive, you can also encrypt your backup drive(s). (If you have an existing backup drive, skip to the next section.)

  1. Launch System Preferences by selecting the System Preferences item from the Apple menu.
  2. Select the Time Machine preference pane.
  3. In the Time Machine preference pane, click the Select Backup Disk button.
  4. In the drop-down sheet which displays available drives that can be used for Time Machine backups, select the drive you wish Time Machine to use for its backups.
  5. At the bottom of the drop-down sheet, you’ll notice an option labeled Encrypt backups. Place a checkmark here, and then click the Use Disk button.
  6. A new sheet will appear, asking you to create a backup password. Enter the backup password, as well as a hint for recovering the password. When you’re ready, click the Encrypt Disk button.
  7. Your Mac will start encrypting the selected drive. This can take quite a while, depending on the size of the backup drive. Expect anywhere from an hour or two to a whole day.
  8. Once the encryption process is complete, your backup data will be secure from prying eyes, just like your Mac’s data.
password hint

What if I already have a backup drive?

If you have an existing (unencrypted) drive that you want to convert to being encrypted, follow these steps first:

In System Preferences:Time Machine, click on the “Select Drive” button. Highlight your existing drive and press the “Remove Disk” button.

selecting drive to encrypt

Once you’ve done that, then press the “Select Drive” button again. This time select that same drive, but also check the checkbox that says, “Encrypt backups”.

If your Mac complains and says that it cannot encrypt the drive, then you will need to use Disk Utility to erase the drive first, and then start from the beginning.

Wait – I think I need some help…

That is why we are here, to help you with every step of this if you want. Contact us and we will get it done for you!

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Troubleshooting, small business networks,
Macs, iPads, and printers
Device syncing, backups,
passwords and email accounts
OS and app optimization and updates, and
preventive maintenance